John Steinbeck:

“Wherever we had been in Russia, in Moscow, in the Ukraine, in Stalingrad, the magical name of Georgia came up constantly. People who had never been there, and who possibly never could go there, spoke of Georgia with a kind of longing and a great admiration. They spoke of Georgians as supermen, as great drinkers, great dancers, great musicians, great workers and lovers. And they spoke of the country in the Caucasus and around the Black Sea as a kind of second heaven. Indeed, we began to believe that most Russians hope that if they live very good and virtuous lives, they will go not to heaven, but to Georgia, when they die. It is a country favored in climate, very rich in soil, and it has its own little ocean.”

“In these terrific Georgians we had met more than our match. They could out-eat us, out-drink us, out-dance us, out-sing us. They had the fierce gaiety of the Italians, and the physical energy of the Burgundians. Everything they did was done with flair. They were quite different from the Russians we had met, and it is easy to see why they are so admired by the citizens of the other Soviet republics. Their energy not only survives but fattens on a tropical climate. And nothing can break their individuality or their spirit. That has been tried for many centuries by invaders, by czarist armies, by despots, by the little local nobility. Everything has struck at their spirit and nothing has succeeded in making a dent in it.” 

 

Jean Chardin:

“The complexion of the Georgians is the most beautiful in all the East; and I can safely say, that I never saw an uncomely countenance in all that country, either of male or female sex; yet I have seen many that have had Angelic faces, nature having bestowed upon the women of that country graces and features that can hardly be found elsewhere. So that it is impossible to behold them without falling in love...”




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Georgia & The Great Caucasus, Full Documentary

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Abano Pass, Georgia - the highest road pass in the Caucasus (2,950 metres - 9,680 ft)



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